The Scorch Trials by James Dashner

Scorch Trials
Hardcover, 1st Edition, 360 pages
Published October 12th 2010

 

Book Two, Woo!

I had some mixed feelings about The Maze Runner. I thought it started off horribly, but by the end I was intrigued. It still wasn’t a great book though and I was surprised by all the love that it got. With the Scorch Trials, I was hoping for two things to happen.

1. That it would be a lot better than the Maze Runner.

Like Divergent, I didn’t really like the first book. In fact, I thought it was stupid. Sorry Divergent fans. But I did think that as the series progressed it did get a bit better. I still didn’t really care for the second book, but I did like the last one, even with the shocking, but not really, twist, that was foreshadowed from the second book.

Still, I did think it got a bit better. I was hoping that this series would get better too. If it didn’t, then the next best thing would be for it to follow the Matched series which was pretty meh throughout.

2. Some of my answers, not all because this is a trilogy, would be answered.

Sometimes the second book in a series seems like filler and while it may make sense for some instances – actually no, filler books never make sense and just fill readers with rage – I still want some of my questions to be answered. Since we’re out of the Maze and into the real world, I expect to see some crazy stuff and then finding out why there is some crazy stuff.

I didn’t go into this expecting much, but expecting everything, so how was it?

The beginning is really good and starts off with a BANG! It’s almost like Dashner realized that a slow beginning wouldn’t work here and instead went all out. I was pumped reading this. The kids find out that the facility they were brought to was actually the start of another test, don’t you hate when that happens? Unlike the last test that was confined in a closed area, this one deals with the outside world. The world that was so messed up that that Alby (spoiler alert) goes on a suicide mission just to avoid seeing it.

And at first, it’s amazing. The world is completely messed up and the sun burns skin, so you have to keep yourself covered, and there’s this virus, called the Flare, that going around that makes people crazy. Kind of like zombies, only somewhat smarter and more organized in the way they kill people. The teens have to make their way to a check point across this terrain that’s filled with crazy people, in order to get a cure. Because WICKED, the organization behind these tests, kind of gave everyone the Flare while they were sleeping.

It’s a race against time, because if they don’t make it they might start killing each other and stuff and then the entire experiment would have been a giant waste of resources and tax dollars.

People start dying and we find out that there is actually another Maze group filled with teen girls that is also trying to get the cure as well.

I’m not sure what happened, but things started in awesomesauceland and then it got stupid. The more I started to think of the Flare, the more I started to question what was the entire point of all this. We know that Thomas and Teresa were at the head of WICKED and helped make sure that this Maze thing would happen. And we also know that WICKED be shady, but why was Thomas at the head of this major organization? Why was the Maze the best thing to do, when you know, building infrastructure to keep the sun’s rays at bay would be more important? Maybe figuring out a way to use the sun’s massive energy to power up these dome like homes, where they can plant, eat, and live merrily. Saving a few kids to better help mankind is a noble cause, but what land would they help if everyone is dead or infect by the virus?

It just doesn’t make sense.

And then I started to think about the teens here and the amount of times they sleep. Sleeping is great, I mean, I love it. Yay sleeping! But when you have an organization that likes injecting its subjects with a horrible virus while they sleep, I would think that these smart saviours of the human races would realize sleeping in shifts would be the best course of action. Sadly, they never figure this out and stuff still happens to them while they sleep.

I also didn’t like how Teresa was completely mishandled. Teresa is almost like the complete opposite of Thomas. He’s willing to go with the status quo, while she always looks at the big picture. Due to some events, Thomas ends up hating her and isn’t able to forgive her for what she did. The thing is this change seemed off. The book does try to make sense of it, by mentioning variable this and test that, but it still didn’t make much sense to me. It’s almost liked Dashner liked the new girl and decided to get Teresa out of the way so that there wouldn’t be an annoying love triangle. While I do appreciate the lack of triangleness, I don’t like how it ruined a good character just to prop the other one up, especially when that character seems to be lying to him too and hiding things as well.

Overall: Unlike the Maze Runner, The Scorch Trials started off with a great start, but the more the world revealed itself the less it made sense. While I could forgive the Maze Runner for some of these nonsensical ideas, I don’t think I can do it here. Plus, it seemed like in the last book there was a clear plot in place, boy enters a strange world, meets people, has to escape. Here, we don’t really have the same luxuries. In The Scorch Trials the plot is, boy enters strange world, goes on test, things happen, some other things happen, people meet him, things happen, other things happen, the end. I’m exaggerating a bit here, but it did feel like there were a bit too many plots and ideas that never really came into fruition. I almost wish it did, because I did like the beginning of the novel.

 

Related articles
Advertisements

2 thoughts on “The Scorch Trials by James Dashner

  1. You pointed out some things that didn’t even cross my mind. I was fueled by the potential of this series, but the execution left me wanting. I was mostly in it for the action. Book three left me with questions too and I chose just ignore them. I still need to read the prequel, maybe it all ties together there…

    • I found book three to be disappointing, because the questions posed had so much potential but the answers provided failed to live up to its expectations. Sadly, I’ve heard that the prequel doesn’t touch on anything from this series, nor does it answer any questions. I think I’ll still read it though, just to see if some of my questions are answered.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s